The Rejection of Cervical Vaccine: Understanding Nigerian Parents’ Stance on Sacrificing Virgins

Busy Bee
Busy Bee November 12, 2023
Updated 2023/11/12 at 10:03 PM

The Lagos State government had planned to immunize girls aged 9 to 14 against cervical cancer on November 1, but the response from parents was disappointing. The lack of enthusiasm from the government, who had no active involvement in the process besides receiving and storing the vaccines, is a clear indication of the general rejection of the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine.

It seems that the government received the feedback of doubt and distrust from the public and chose not to provoke further anger by implementing a policy that would require parental consent, as they did during the COVID-19 crisis.

On various school WhatsApp groups, parents overwhelmingly voted “No” when the school authorities shared a notification from the state government about the vaccine. Some parents expressed exaggerated outrage at the mere suggestion of the vaccine, providing an element of humor in a situation that should make the government reflect, provided they have the capability and integrity to do so. Nigerians, regardless of race, religion, gender, or age, are not likely to pass up on freebies, even if it’s something as trivial as a disposable pack of rice.

This includes even those who can afford the “free lunch,” without their wallets flinching. And now, we are discussing a potential life-saving measure, yet the resounding response was “No,” even in Lagos, the most diverse and populous state.

This skepticism seems to be prevalent nationwide and can be attributed to the widespread dissemination of anti-HPV vaccine messaging. The impact of the anti-vaxx campaign was too powerful for the government’s efforts to raise awareness.

Papilloma, a major health campaign in the country, was a complete failure. The fact that even well-educated and informed Nigerian parents fell for the no-vaccine campaign highlights a deep-rooted distrust in health and medical messaging from HPV promoters. The vaccine’s unsuccessful outcome suggests that Nigerians have made up their minds about who they do not trust with their health, especially when it comes to reproductive health, and Bill Gates, who is associated with Microsoft and sits atop the list of untrustworthy individuals, is at the forefront of this mistrust

. Although the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI), based in Switzerland, is the main organization behind the Papilloma vaccine, they proudly tout their association with Gates as a major supporter. Don’t they say that he who pays the piper calls the tune?

They have a long history of association and partnership, even during the COVID era when various vaccines were imposed on Nigeria, including ones that were nearing expiration. Nigerians, true to their nature, disposed of millions of doses by flushing them down the toilet, despite official records indicating they were received by individuals. Meanwhile, relatives working in the healthcare sector continued to produce vaccine cards under pressure to present them to family members.

If the government ever wishes to impose something on Nigerians again, they should reconsider their intentions and gauge the public’s mood and desires, especially when foreigners are introducing their creations under the guise of the “common good”. Official manipulation can be counteracted. Those responsible for enforcement will ensure its defeat. Shouldn’t we be emphasizing our shared humanity here?

As scrutiny increased, many people in Africa began to lose faith in Gates’ philanthropy. This was largely due to his 2010 statement on a Ted Talk show, where he mentioned that if advancements in vaccines, healthcare, and reproductive health services were successful, global population growth could be reduced by 10 or 15 percent. While he did not directly state that 3 billion people should be eliminated from the population, his alarming calculations regarding future reproduction raised suspicions about his intentions to control reproductive health.

As scrutiny increased, many people in Africa began to lose faith in Gates’ philanthropy. This was largely due to his 2010 statement on a Ted Talk show, where he mentioned that if advancements in vaccines, healthcare, and reproductive health services were successful, global population growth could be reduced by 10 or 15 percent. While he did not directly state that 3 billion people should be eliminated from the population, his alarming calculations regarding future reproduction raised suspicions about his intentions to control reproductive health.

The Ministry of Health, in collaboration with organizations like GAVI, Unicef, WHO, and others, is urging parents, churches, schools, and various stakeholders to bring forward our girls, aged 9-14 years, for mass vaccination against HPV.

In the UK and USA, parents are required to provide consent before their children receive the vaccine.

We express serious concerns and reservations regarding this vaccine, considering that HPV, which it aims to prevent, is a sexually transmitted infection. This means that children who are not sexually active are not at risk of contracting the infection.

Therefore, the most cost-effective and suitable approach is to employ social and behavioral methods, similar to those used for other infections, to educate young girls about respecting their femininity, their bodies, and the bodies of others. Encouraging chastity as a way of life can help preserve and promote healthy relationships within the context of marriage and family.

There are reports of adverse effects associated with the vaccine, ranging from death to cancer, neurological disorders, including paralysis, ovarian failure, and infertility. Currently, there are numerous class action lawsuits in the USA, UK, Colombia, and other countries against the manufacturers of the HPV vaccine. These legal actions demand the withdrawal of the vaccine from circulation and seek compensation for injuries, deaths, infertility, and other adverse outcomes experienced by the victims.

Ideally, healthcare providers should provide patients and clients with adequate and accurate information necessary to make informed decisions about a particular medical intervention, rather than coercing or forcing them. This decision can be to provide consent or to decline the intervention. In the case of the HPV vaccine, the public has not received sufficient and accurate information about the potential benefits and risks of the vaccine.

It’s important to clarify that the HPV vaccine aims to prevent HPV infection, which is sexually transmitted, as mentioned earlier, and not specifically cervical cancer, as some have been led to believe. Therefore, there is misinformation surrounding the vaccine.

Additionally, the vaccine currently promoted in Nigeria, Gadasil, may not be effective against the strains of HPV prevalent in Nigerian and African women.

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